Goto Chapter: Top 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A Bib Ind
 [Top of Book]  [Contents]   [Previous Chapter]   [Next Chapter] 

4 Non-interactive ANUPQ functions
 4.1 Computing p-Quotients
 4.2 Computing Standard Presentations
 4.3 Testing p-Groups for Isomorphism
 4.4 Computing Descendants of a p-Group

4 Non-interactive ANUPQ functions

Here we describe all the non-interactive functions of the ANUPQ package; i.e. "one-shot" functions that invoke the pq program in such a way that once GAP has got what it needs, the pq program is allowed to exit. It is expected that most of the time users will only need these functions. The functions interface with three of the four algorithms (see Chapter Introduction) provided by the ANU pq C program, and are mainly grouped according to the algorithm of the pq program they relate to.

In Section Computing p-Quotients, we describe the functions that give access to the p-quotient algorithm.

Section Computing Standard Presentations describe functions that give access to the standard presentation algorithm.

Section Testing p-Groups for Isomorphism describe functions that implement an isomorphism test for p-groups using the standard presentation algorithm.

In Section Computing Descendants of a p-Group, we describe functions that give access to the p-group generation algorithm.

To use any of the functions one must have at some stage previously typed:

gap> LoadPackage("anupq");

(the response of which we have omitted; see Loading the ANUPQ Package).

It is strongly recommended that the user try the examples provided. To save typing there is a PqExample equivalent for each manual example. We also suggest that to start with you may find the examples more instructive if you set the InfoANUPQ level to 2 (see InfoANUPQ (3.3-1)).

4.1 Computing p-Quotients

4.1-1 Pq
‣ Pq( F: options )( function )

returns for the fp or pc group F, the p-quotient of F specified by options, as a pc group. Following the colon, options is a selection of the options from the following list, separated by commas like record components (see Section Reference: Function Call With Options in the GAP Reference Manual). As a minimum the user must supply a value for the Prime option. Below we list the options recognised by Pq (see Chapter ANUPQ Options for detailed descriptions).

Notes: Pq may also be called with no arguments or one integer argument, in which case it is being used interactively (see Pq (5.3-1)); the same options may be used, except that SetupFile and PqWorkspace are ignored by the interactive Pq function.

See Section Attributes and a Property for fp and pc p-groups for the attributes and property NuclearRank, MultiplicatorRank and IsCapable which may be applied to the group returned by Pq.

See also PqEpimorphism (PqEpimorphism (4.1-2)).

We now give a few examples of the use of Pq. Except for the addition of a few comments and the non-suppression of output (by not using duplicated semicolons) the next 3 examples may be run by typing: PqExample( "Pq" ); (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

gap> LoadPackage("anupq");; # does nothing if ANUPQ is already loaded
gap> # First we get a p-quotient of a free group of rank 2
gap> F := FreeGroup("a", "b");; a := F.1;; b := F.2;;
gap> Pq( F : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 3 ); 
<pc group of size 1024 with 10 generators>
gap> # Now let us get a p-quotient of an fp group
gap> G := F / [a^4, b^4];
<fp group on the generators [ a, b ]>
gap> Pq( G : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 3 ); 
<pc group of size 256 with 8 generators>
gap> # Now let's get a different p-quotient of the same group
gap> Pq( G : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 3, Exponent := 4 ); 
<pc group of size 128 with 7 generators>
gap> # Now we'll get a p-quotient of another fp group
gap> # which we will redo using the `Relators' option
gap> R := [ a^25, Comm(Comm(b, a), a), b^5 ];
[ a^25, a^-1*b^-1*a*b*a^-1*b^-1*a^-1*b*a^2, b^5 ]
gap> H := F / R;
<fp group on the generators [ a, b ]>
gap> Pq( H : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 5, Metabelian );
<pc group of size 78125 with 7 generators>

Now we redo the last example to show how one may use the Relators option. Observe that Comm(Comm(b, a), a) is a left normed commutator which must be written in square bracket notation for the pq program and embedded in a pair of double quotes. The function PqGAPRelators (see PqGAPRelators (3.4-2)) can be used to translate a list of strings prepared for the Relators option into GAP format. Below we use it. Observe that the value of R is the same as before.

gap> F := FreeGroup("a", "b");;
gap> # `F' was defined for `Relators'. We use the same strings that GAP uses
gap> # for printing the free group generators. It is *not* necessary to
gap> # predefine: a := F.1; etc. (as it was above).
gap> rels := [ "a^25", "[b, a, a]", "b^5" ];
[ "a^25", "[b, a, a]", "b^5" ]
gap> R := PqGAPRelators(F, rels);
[ a^25, a^-1*b^-1*a*b*a^-1*b^-1*a^-1*b*a^2, b^5 ]
gap> H := F / R;
<fp group on the generators [ a, b ]>
gap> Pq( H : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 5, Metabelian, 
>            Relators := rels );
<pc group of size 78125 with 7 generators>

In fact, above we could have just passed F (rather than H), i.e. we could have done:

gap> F := FreeGroup("a", "b");;
gap> rels := [ "a^25", "[b, a, a]", "b^5" ];
[ "a^25", "[b, a, a]", "b^5" ]
gap> Pq( F : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 5, Metabelian, 
>            Relators := rels );
<pc group of size 78125 with 7 generators>

The non-interactive Pq function also allows the options to be passed in two other ways; these alternatives have been included for those familiar with the GAP 3 version of the ANUPQ package; the preferred method of passing options is the one already described. Firstly, they may be passed in a record as a second argument; note that any boolean options must be set explicitly e.g.

gap> Pq( H, rec( Prime := 5, ClassBound := 5, Metabelian := true ) );
<pc group of size 78125 with 7 generators>

It is also possible to pass them as extra arguments, where each option name appears as a string followed immediately by its value (if not a boolean option) e.g.

gap> Pq( H, "Prime", 5, "ClassBound", 5, "Metabelian" );
<pc group of size 78125 with 7 generators>

The preceding two examples can be run from GAP via PqExample( "Pq-ni" ); (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

This method of passing options permits abbreviation; the only restriction is that the abbreviation must be unique. So "Pr" may be used for "Prime", "Class" or even just "C" for "ClassBound", etc.

The following example illustrates the use of the option Identities. We compute the largest finite Burnside group of exponent 5 that also satisfies the 3-Engel identity. Each identity is defined by a function whose arguments correspond to the variables of the identity. The return value of each of those functions is the identity evaluated on the arguments of the function.

gap> F := FreeGroup(2);
<free group on the generators [ f1, f2 ]>
gap> Burnside5 := x->x^5;
function( x ) ... end
gap> Engel3 := function( x,y ) return PqLeftNormComm( [x,y,y,y] ); end;
function( x, y ) ... end
gap> Pq( F : Prime := 5, Identities := [ Burnside5, Engel3 ] );
#I  Class 1 with 2 generators.
#I  Class 2 with 3 generators.
#I  Class 3 with 5 generators.
#I  Class 3 with 5 generators.
<pc group of size 3125 with 5 generators>

The above example can be run from GAP via PqExample( "B5-5-Engel3-Id" ); (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

4.1-2 PqEpimorphism
‣ PqEpimorphism( F: options )( function )

returns for the fp or pc group F an epimorphism from F onto the p-quotient of F specified by options; the possible options options and required option ("Prime") are as for Pq (see Pq (4.1-1)). PqEpimorphism only differs from Pq in what it outputs; everything about what must/may be passed as input to PqEpimorphism is the same as for Pq. The same alternative methods of passing options to the non-interactive Pq function are available to the non-interactive version of PqEpimorphism.

Notes: PqEpimorphism may also be called with no arguments or one integer argument, in which case it is being used interactively (see PqEpimorphism (5.3-2)), and the options SetupFile and PqWorkspace are ignored by the interactive PqEpimorphism function.

See Section Attributes and a Property for fp and pc p-groups for the attributes and property NuclearRank, MultiplicatorRank and IsCapable which may be applied to the image group of the epimorphism returned by PqEpimorphism.

gap> F := FreeGroup (2, "F");
<free group on the generators [ F1, F2 ]>
gap> phi := PqEpimorphism( F : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 2 );
[ F1, F2 ] -> [ f1, f2 ]
gap> Image( phi );
<pc group of size 3125 with 5 generators>

Typing: PqExample( "PqEpimorphism" ); runs the above example in GAP (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

4.1-3 PqPCover
‣ PqPCover( F: options )( function )

returns for the fp or pc group F, the p-covering group of the p-quotient of F specified by options, as a pc group, i.e. the p-covering group of the p-quotient Pq( F : options ). Thus the options that PqPCover accepts are exactly those expected for Pq (and hence as a minimum the user must supply a value for the Prime option; see Pq (4.1-1) for more details), except in the following special case.

If F is already a p-group, in the sense that IsPGroup(F) is true, then

Prime

defaults to PrimePGroup(F), if not supplied and HasPrimePGroup(F) = true; and

ClassBound

defaults to PClassPGroup(F) if HasPClassPGroup(F) = true if not supplied, or to the usual default of 63, otherwise.

The same alternative methods of passing options to the non-interactive Pq function are available to the non-interactive version of PqPCover.

We now give a few examples of the use of PqPCover. These examples are just a subset of the ones we gave for Pq (see Pq (4.1-1)), except that in each instance the command Pq has been replaced with PqPCover. Essentially the same examples may be run by typing: PqExample( "PqPCover" ); (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

gap> F := FreeGroup("a", "b");; a := F.1;; b := F.2;;
gap> PqPCover( F : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 3 );
<pc group of size 262144 with 18 generators>
gap> 
gap> # Now let's get a p-cover of a p-quotient of an fp group
gap> G := F / [a^4, b^4];
<fp group on the generators [ a, b ]>
gap> PqPCover( G : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 3 );
<pc group of size 16384 with 14 generators>
gap> 
gap> # Now let's get a p-cover of a different p-quotient of the same group
gap> PqPCover( G : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 3, Exponent := 4 );
<pc group of size 8192 with 13 generators>
gap> 
gap> # Now we'll get a p-cover of a p-quotient of another fp group
gap> # which we will redo using the `Relators' option
gap> R := [ a^25, Comm(Comm(b, a), a), b^5 ];
[ a^25, a^-1*b^-1*a*b*a^-1*b^-1*a^-1*b*a^2, b^5 ]
gap> H := F / R;
<fp group on the generators [ a, b ]>
gap> PqPCover( H : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 5, Metabelian );
<pc group of size 48828125 with 11 generators>
gap> 
gap> # Now we redo the previous example using the `Relators' option
gap> F := FreeGroup("a", "b");;
gap> rels := [ "a^25", "[b, a, a]", "b^5" ];
[ "a^25", "[b, a, a]", "b^5" ]
gap> PqPCover( F : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 5, Metabelian, 
>                  Relators := rels );
<pc group of size 48828125 with 11 generators>

4.2 Computing Standard Presentations

4.2-1 PqStandardPresentation
‣ PqStandardPresentation( F: options )( function )
‣ StandardPresentation( F: options )( method )

return the p-quotient specified by options of the fp or pc p-group F, as an fp group which has a standard presentation. Here options is a selection of the options from the following list (see Chapter ANUPQ Options for detailed descriptions). Section Hints and Warnings regarding the use of Options gives some important hints and warnings regarding option usage, and Section Reference: Function Call With Options in the GAP Reference Manual describes their "record"-like syntax.

Unless F is a pc p-group, the user must supply either the option Prime or the option pQuotient (if both Prime and pQuotient are supplied, the prime p is determined by applying PrimePGroup (see PrimePGroup (Reference: PrimePGroup) in the Reference Manual) to the value of pQuotient).

The options for PqStandardPresentation may also be passed in the two other alternative ways described for Pq (see Pq (4.1-1)). StandardPresentation does not provide these alternative ways of passing options.

Notes: In contrast to the function Pq (see Pq (4.1-1)) which returns a pc group, PqStandardPresentation or StandardPresentation returns an fp group. This is because the output is mainly used for isomorphism testing for which an fp group is enough. However, the presentation is a polycyclic presentation and if you need to do any further computation with this group (e.g. to find the order) you can use the function PcGroupFpGroup (see PcGroupFpGroup (Reference: PcGroupFpGroup) in the GAP Reference Manual) to form a pc group.

If the user does not supply a p-quotient Q via the pQuotient option and the prime p is either supplied or F is a pc p-group, then a p-quotient Q is computed. If the user does supply a p-quotient Q via the pQuotient option, the package AutPGrp is called to compute the automorphism group of Q; an error will occur that asks the user to install the package AutPGrp if the automorphism group cannot be computed.

The attributes and property NuclearRank, MultiplicatorRank and IsCapable are set for the group returned by PqStandardPresentation or StandardPresentation (see Section Attributes and a Property for fp and pc p-groups).

We illustrate the method with the following examples.

gap> F := FreeGroup( "a", "b" );; a := F.1;; b := F.2;;
gap> G := F / [a^25, Comm(Comm(b, a), a), b^5];
<fp group on the generators [ a, b ]>
gap> S := StandardPresentation( G : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 10 );
<fp group on the generators [ f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6, f7, f8, f9, f10, f11, 
  f12, f13, f14, f15, f16, f17, f18, f19, f20, f21, f22, f23, f24, f25, f26 ]>
gap> IsPcGroup( S );
false
gap> # if we need to compute with S we should convert it to a pc group
gap> Spc := PcGroupFpGroup( S );
<pc group of size 1490116119384765625 with 26 generators>
gap> 
gap> H := F / [ a^625, Comm(Comm(Comm(Comm(b, a), a), a), a)/Comm(b, a)^5,
>               Comm(Comm(b, a), b), b^625 ];;
gap> StandardPresentation( H : Prime := 5, ClassBound := 15, Metabelian );
<fp group on the generators [ f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6, f7, f8, f9, f10, f11, 
  f12, f13, f14, f15, f16, f17, f18, f19, f20 ]>
gap> 
gap> F4 := FreeGroup( "a", "b", "c", "d" );;
gap> a := F4.1;; b := F4.2;; c := F4.3;; d := F4.4;;
gap> G4 := F4 / [ b^4, b^2 / Comm(Comm (b, a), a), d^16,
>                 a^16 / (c * d), b^8 / (d * c^4) ];
<fp group on the generators [ a, b, c, d ]>
gap> K := Pq( G4 : Prime := 2, ClassBound := 1 );
<pc group of size 4 with 2 generators>
gap> StandardPresentation( G4 : pQuotient := K, ClassBound := 14 );
<fp group with 53 generators>

Typing: PqExample( "StandardPresentation" ); runs the above example in GAP (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

4.2-2 EpimorphismPqStandardPresentation
‣ EpimorphismPqStandardPresentation( F: options )( function )
‣ EpimorphismStandardPresentation( F: options )( method )

Each of the above functions accepts the same arguments and options as the function StandardPresentation (see StandardPresentation (4.2-1)) and returns an epimorphism from the fp or pc group F onto the finitely presented group given by a standard presentation, i.e. if S is the standard presentation computed for the p-quotient of F by StandardPresentation then EpimorphismStandardPresentation returns the epimorphism from F to the group with presentation S.

Note: The attributes and property NuclearRank, MultiplicatorRank and IsCapable are set for the image group of the epimorphism returned by EpimorphismPqStandardPresentation or EpimorphismStandardPresentation (see Section Attributes and a Property for fp and pc p-groups).

We illustrate the function with the following example.

gap> F := FreeGroup(6, "F");
<free group on the generators [ F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6 ]>
gap> # For printing GAP uses the symbols F1, ... for the generators of F
gap> x := F.1;; y := F.2;; z := F.3;; w := F.4;; a := F.5;; b := F.6;;
gap> R := [x^3 / w, y^3 / w * a^2 * b^2, w^3 / b,
>          Comm (y, x) / z, Comm (z, x), Comm (z, y) / a, z^3 ];;
gap> Q := F / R;
<fp group on the generators [ F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6 ]>
gap> # For printing GAP also uses the symbols F1, ... for the generators of Q
gap> # (the same as used for F) ... but the gen'rs of Q and F are different:
gap> GeneratorsOfGroup(F) = GeneratorsOfGroup(Q);
false
gap> G := Pq( Q : Prime := 3, ClassBound := 3 );
<pc group of size 729 with 6 generators>
gap> phi := EpimorphismStandardPresentation( Q : Prime := 3,
>                                                ClassBound := 3 );
[ F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6 ] -> [ f1*f2^2*f3*f4^2*f5^2, f1*f2*f3*f5, f3^2, 
  f4*f6^2, f5, f6 ]
gap> Source(phi); # This is the group Q (GAP uses F1, ... for gen'r symbols)
<fp group of size infinity on the generators [ F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, F6 ]>
gap> Range(phi);  # This is the group G (GAP uses f1, ... for gen'r symbols)
<fp group on the generators [ f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6 ]>
gap> AssignGeneratorVariables(G);
#I  Assigned the global variables [ f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6 ]
gap> # Just to see that the images of [F1, ..., F6] do generate G
gap> Group([ f1*f2^2*f3, f1*f2*f3*f4*f5^2*f6^2, f3^2, f4, f5, f6 ]) = G;
true
gap> Size( Image(phi) );
729

Typing: PqExample( "EpimorphismStandardPresentation" ); runs the above example in GAP (see PqExample (3.4-4)). Note that AssignGeneratorVariables (see AssignGeneratorVariables (Reference: AssignGeneratorVariables)) has only been available since GAP 4.3.

4.3 Testing p-Groups for Isomorphism

4.3-1 IsPqIsomorphicPGroup
‣ IsPqIsomorphicPGroup( G, H )( function )
‣ IsIsomorphicPGroup( G, H )( method )

each return true if G is isomorphic to H, where both G and H must be pc groups of prime power order. These functions compute and compare in GAP the fp groups given by standard presentations for G and H (see StandardPresentation (4.2-1)).

gap> G := Group( (1,2,3,4), (1,3) );
Group([ (1,2,3,4), (1,3) ])
gap> P1 := Image( IsomorphismPcGroup( G ) );
Group([ f1, f2, f3 ])
gap> P2 := SmallGroup( 8, 5 );
<pc group of size 8 with 3 generators>
gap> IsIsomorphicPGroup( P1, P2 );
false
gap> P3 := SmallGroup( 8, 4 );
<pc group of size 8 with 3 generators>
gap> IsIsomorphicPGroup( P1, P3 );
false
gap> P4 := SmallGroup( 8, 3 );
<pc group of size 8 with 3 generators>
gap> IsIsomorphicPGroup( P1, P4 );
true

Typing: PqExample( "IsIsomorphicPGroup" ); runs the above example in GAP (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

4.4 Computing Descendants of a p-Group

4.4-1 PqDescendants
‣ PqDescendants( G: options )( function )

returns, for the pc group G which must be of prime power order with a confluent pc presentation (see IsConfluent (Reference: IsConfluent (for pc groups)) in the GAP Reference Manual), a list of descendants (pc groups) of G. Following the colon options a selection of the options listed below should be given, separated by commas like record components (see Section Reference: Function Call With Options in the GAP Reference Manual). See Chapter ANUPQ Options for detailed descriptions of the options.

The automorphism group of each descendant D is also computed via a call to the AutomorphismGroupPGroup function of the AutPGrp package.

Notes: The function PqDescendants uses the automorphism group of G which it computes via the package AutPGrp. If this package is not installed an error may be raised. If the automorphism group of G is insoluble, the pq program will call GAP together with the AutPGrp package for certain orbit-stabilizer calculations. (So, in any case, one should ensure the AutPGrp package is installed.)

The attributes and property NuclearRank, MultiplicatorRank and IsCapable are set for each group of the list returned by PqDescendants (see Section Attributes and a Property for fp and pc p-groups).

The options options for PqDescendants may be passed in an alternative manner to that already described, namely you can pass PqDescendants a record as an argument, which contains as entries some (or all) of the above mentioned. Those parameters which do not occur in the record are set to their default values.

Note that you cannot set both OrderBound and StepSize.

In the first example we compute all descendants of the Klein four group which have exponent-2 class at most 5 and order at most 2^6.

gap> F := FreeGroup( "a", "b" );; a := F.1;; b := F.2;;
gap> G := PcGroupFpGroup( F / [ a^2, b^2, Comm(b, a) ] );
<pc group of size 4 with 2 generators>
gap> des := PqDescendants( G : OrderBound := 6, ClassBound := 5 );;
gap> Length(des);
83
gap> List(des, Size); 
[ 8, 8, 8, 16, 16, 16, 32, 16, 16, 16, 16, 16, 32, 32, 64, 64, 32, 32, 32, 
  32, 32, 32, 32, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 32, 32, 32, 32, 
  64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 64, 64, 64, 
  64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 
  64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64 ]
gap> List(des, d -> Length( PCentralSeries( d, 2 ) ) - 1 );
[ 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 
  3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 
  4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 
  4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5 ]

Below, we compute all capable descendants of order 27 of the elementary abelian group of order 9.

gap> F := FreeGroup( 2, "g" );
<free group on the generators [ g1, g2 ]>
gap> G := PcGroupFpGroup( F / [ F.1^3, F.2^3, Comm(F.1, F.2) ] );
<pc group of size 9 with 2 generators>
gap> des := PqDescendants( G : OrderBound := 3, ClassBound := 2,
>                              CapableDescendants );
[ <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators> ]
gap> List(des, d -> Length( PCentralSeries( d, 3 ) ) - 1 );
[ 2, 2 ]
gap> # For comparison let us now compute all descendants
gap> PqDescendants( G : OrderBound := 3, ClassBound := 2);
[ <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators> ]

In the third example, we compute all capable descendants of the elementary abelian group of order 5^2 which have exponent-5 class at most 3, exponent 5, and are metabelian.

gap> F := FreeGroup( 2, "g" );;
gap> G := PcGroupFpGroup( F / [ F.1^5, F.2^5, Comm(F.2, F.1) ] );
<pc group of size 25 with 2 generators>
gap> des := PqDescendants( G : Metabelian, ClassBound := 3,
>                              Exponent := 5, CapableDescendants );
[ <pc group of size 125 with 3 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 625 with 4 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 3125 with 5 generators> ]
gap> List(des, d -> Length( PCentralSeries( d, 5 ) ) - 1 );
[ 2, 3, 3 ]
gap> List(des, d -> Length( DerivedSeries( d ) ) );
[ 3, 3, 3 ]
gap> List(des, d -> Maximum( List( Elements(d), Order ) ) );
[ 5, 5, 5 ]

The examples "PqDescendants-1", "PqDescendants-2" and "PqDescendants-3" (in order) are essentially the same as the above three examples (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

4.4-2 PqSupplementInnerAutomorphisms
‣ PqSupplementInnerAutomorphisms( D )( function )

returns a generating set for a supplement to the inner automorphisms of D, in the form of a record with fields agAutos, agOrder and glAutos, as provided by the pq program. One should be very careful in using these automorphisms for a descendant calculation.

Note: In principle there must be a way to use those automorphisms in order to compute descendants but there does not seem to be a way to hand back these automorphisms properly to the pq program.

gap> Q := Pq( FreeGroup(2) : Prime := 3, ClassBound := 1 );
<pc group of size 9 with 2 generators>
gap> des := PqDescendants( Q : StepSize := 1 );
[ <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators>, 
  <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators> ]
gap> S := PqSupplementInnerAutomorphisms( des[3] );
rec( agAutos := [  ], agOrder := [ 3, 2, 2, 2 ], 
  glAutos := [ Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1*f2^2, f2, f3 ], 
      Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1^2, f2, f3^2 ], 
      Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1^2, f2, f3^2 ] ] )
gap> A := AutomorphismGroupPGroup( des[3] );
rec( 
  agAutos := [ Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1^2, f2, f3^2 ], 
      Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1*f2^2, f2, f3 ], 
      Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1*f3, f2, f3 ], 
      Pcgs([ f1, f2, f3 ]) -> [ f1, f2*f3, f3 ] ], agOrder := [ 2, 3, 3, 3 ], 
  glAutos := [  ], glOper := [  ], glOrder := 1, 
  group := <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators>, 
  one := IdentityMapping( <pc group of size 27 with 3 generators> ), 
  size := 54 )

Typing: PqExample( "PqSupplementInnerAutomorphisms" ); runs the above example in GAP (see PqExample (3.4-4)).

Note that by also including PqStart as a second argument to PqExample one can see how it is possible, with the aid of PqSetPQuotientToGroup (see PqSetPQuotientToGroup (5.3-7)), to do the equivalent computations with the interactive versions of Pq and PqDescendants and a single pq process (recall pq is the name of the external C program).

4.4-3 PqList
‣ PqList( filename: [SubList := sub] )( function )

reads a file with name filename (a string) and returns the list L of pc groups (or with option SubList a sublist of L or a single pc group in L) defined in that file. If the option SubList is passed and has the value sub, then it has the same meaning as for PqDescendants, i.e. if sub is an integer then PqList returns L[sub]; otherwise, if sub is a list of integers PqList returns Sublist(L, sub ).

Both PqList and SavePqList (see SavePqList (4.4-4)) can be used to save and restore a list of descendants (see PqDescendants (4.4-1)).

4.4-4 SavePqList
‣ SavePqList( filename, list )( function )

writes a list of descendants list to a file with name filename (a string).

SavePqList and PqList (see PqList (4.4-3)) can be used to save and restore, respectively, the results of PqDescendants (see PqDescendants (4.4-1)).

 [Top of Book]  [Contents]   [Previous Chapter]   [Next Chapter] 
Goto Chapter: Top 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A Bib Ind

generated by GAPDoc2HTML